The Right Toys at the Right Ages




This tips is from here:

Always read labels to make sure a toy is appropriate for a child's age. Still, use your own best judgment — and consider your child's temperament, habits, and behavior whenever you buy a new toy. You may think that a child who's advanced in comparison to peers can handle toys meant for older kids. But the age levels for toys are determined by safety factors, not intelligence or maturity. Here are some age-specific guidelines to keep in mind:

For Infants, Toddlers, and Preschoolers

  • Look for toys that are sturdy enough to withstand pulling and twisting. Make sure that eyes, noses, buttons, and other parts that could break off are securely attached.
  • Make sure squeeze toys, rattles, and teethers are large enough that they won't become lodged in a child's mouth or throat, even if squeezed into a smaller compressed shape.
  • Avoid toys with cords or long strings, which could present strangulation hazards to young kids.
  • Avoid thin plastic toys that might break into small pieces and leave jagged edges that could cut.
  • Avoid marbles, coins, balls, and games with balls that are 1.75 inches (4.4 centimeters) in diameter or less because they present choking hazards.

Since choking is such a big risk in the early years, if your child is 3 years old or younger, consider buying a small-parts tester, also known as a choke tube. These tubes are designed to be about the same diameter as a child's windpipe. If an object fits inside the tube, then it's too small for a young child.

For Grade-Scholers

  • Bicycles, scooters, skateboards, and inline skates should never be used without helmets that meet current safety standards and other recommended safety gear, like hand, wrist and shin guards. Look for CPSC or Snell certification on the labels.
  • Nets should be well constructed and firmly attached to the rim so that they don't become strangulation hazards.
  • Toy darts or arrows should have soft tips or suction cups at the end, not hard points.
  • Toy guns should be brightly colored so they cannot be mistaken for real weapons, and kids should be taught to never point darts, arrows, or guns at anyone.
  • BB guns or pellet rifles should not be given to kids under the age of 16.
  • Electric toys should be labeled UL, meaning they meet safety standards set by Underwriters Laboratories.




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